We settled in for a quiet Friday night (post Thanksgiving festivities) with a crackling fire and a pair of small movies we thought would be interesting.

Uncertainty is a 4 year old Joe Gordon-Levitt outing, low budget, largely improv dialogue, about the decisions a couple take on 4th July in New York. The comparison to Sliding Doors is inevitable, but they choose chance, flipping a coin to decide whether to attend a family dinner or a friend’s party.

The film divides, following each option (handily colour coded for easy reference), with one thread following the quiet drama of Kate’s (John Carter‘s Lynn Collins) family as she tries to decide whether to keep her baby, and the other becoming a paranoid thriller after the couple pick up a cell phone in a taxi.

I’m going to spoil here, so stop reading if you’re curious in JGL’s back catalogue.

I like to say that I don’t watch much tv. It’s true as far as it goes: I get very excited about my annual fix of Sherlock and Doctor Who (yes, I enjoy Moffat), but otherwise tend to watch the odd satirical news quiz and movies. And every now and again I indulge in some high production value US series on DVD, and wonder why it’s taken me so long.

So, here's an experiment: watch along with the reptile.

If you haven't seen The Cabin in the Woods and you do want to, best not to go any further as I'm just going to react as I go. Yes, this is partially about reducing the jumps given my boy is on the other side of the world. This is why I'm watching Cabin and not going to go see The Shining (tempting, but I'm stupid, not crazy).

So without further ado…

I think the real problem with This Means War is that I know it’s terrible, but I still can’t resist the outrageous levels of charm exuded by its three stars (Chris Pine, Tom Hardy, Reese Witherspoon).

Caught up last night with The Devil’s Double (in which Dominic Cooper reminds us that he can act, whilst remaining unaverse to chewing up scenery) and The Guard (in which Brendan Gleeson is unashamed of his pants). Two more dissimilar films may not exist, but we couldn’t face Drive after the bloodied insanity of Usay Hussain.

I first stumbled across A Brief History of the Dead in 2007, but never got round to reading it. I was delighted when it was picked as the inaugural volume for the new work bookclub. I'm unashamedly going to use LJ to capture my thoughts and impressions of each bookclub book I read, to help manage the gap between me finishing it and the group getting together to discuss.

First things first: ABHotD is the tale of Laura, a scientist working for Coca-Cola, who is sent to Antarctica as part of a PR stunt. When a pandemic plague sweeps the world, she is protected by her position, but ignorant of current events. Her storyline is her fight for survival in (probably) the least hospitable place in the world, as she struggles across the ice cap in search of help that can never come.

The dead of the title are the twin storyline, living on (existing?) in a city for as long as they are remembered by the living. As the city empties due to plague (think about it), the survivors find new connections in the web of Laura's past.